The aging mouse microbiome has obesogenic characteristics

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Revision as of 17:35, 11 November 2023 by LGeistlinger (talk | contribs)
incomplete
study design
Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
URI
Authors
Binyamin D, Werbner N, Nuriel-Ohayon M, Uzan A, Mor H, Abbas A, Ziv O, Teperino R, Gutman R, Koren O
Journal
Genome medicine
Year
2020
Keywords:
Aging, Fecal microbiota transplantation, Metabolism, Microbiome
BACKGROUND: During aging, there is a physiological decline, an increase of morbidity and mortality, and a natural change in the gut microbiome. In this study, we investigated the influence of the gut microbiome on different metabolic parameters in adult and aged mice. METHODS: Fecal and blood samples from adult (n = 42, 100-300 days) and aging (n = 32, 550-750 days) mice were collected. Microbiome analysis was done using QIIME2. Mouse weight and body composition were measured using NMR, and insulin and leptin levels in the blood were measured with Mouse Adipokine Magnetic Bead Panel kit. Fecal microbiota transplantation experiments from adult and aged mice into young germ-free mice were carried out in order to examine the effect of the gut microbiome of adult and aging mice on weight, body composition, insulin, and leptin. RESULTS: We demonstrate that the microbiomes from adult and aged mice are distinguishable. We also report changes in metabolic parameters as we observed significantly higher weight and fat mass and low lean mass in aged compared to adult mice along with high insulin and leptin levels in the blood. The transplanted gut microbiome from aged mice transferred part of the phenotypes seen in aged mice. Fat body mass and insulin levels were higher in the mice who received feces from aged mice than mice receiving feces from adult mice. In addition, they consumed more food and had a higher respiratory quotient compared to mice receiving adult feces. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that aged mice have a gut microbiota with obesogenic characteristics. In addition, the gut bacterial population itself is sufficient to induce some of the manifestations of obesity.

Experiment 1


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Peace Sandy on 2024-2-20

Curated date: 2023/10/18

Curator: Greatman

Revision editor(s): Greatman, LGeistlinger, Peace Sandy

Subjects

Location of subjects
Israel
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled. Contact us to have more species added.
Mus musculus
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Feces , Blood vessel Cow dung,Cow pat,Droppings,Dung,Excrement,Excreta,Faeces,Fecal material,Fecal matter,Fewmet,Frass,Guano,Matières fécales@fr,Merde@fr,Ordure,Partie de la merde@fr,Piece of shit,Porción de mierda@es,Portion of dung,Portion of excrement,Portion of faeces,Portion of fecal material,Portion of fecal matter,Portion of feces,Portion of guano,Portion of scat,Portionem cacas,Scat,Spoor,Spraint,Stool,Teil der fäkalien@de,Feces,feces,Region of vascular tree organ,Vas sanguineum,Vascular element,Vascular tree organ region,Blood vessel,blood vessel
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
Body weight weight,Body weight,body weight
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
Adult
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
Aging
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
Aging Mice
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
42
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
32
Antibiotics exclusion Number of days without antibiotics usage (if applicable) and other antibiotics-related criteria used to exclude participants (if any)
NIL

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
16S variable region One or more hypervariable region(s) of the bacterial 16S gene
V4
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
Illumina

Statistical Analysis

Data transformation Data transformation applied to microbial abundance measurements prior to differential abundance testing (if any).
relative abundances
Statistical test
PERMANOVA
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
0.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
Yes

Alpha Diversity

Faith Phylogenetic diversity, takes into account phylogenetic distance of all taxa identified in a sample
increased

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by LGeistlinger on 2023-11-11

Curated date: 2023/10/18

Curator: Greatman

Revision editor(s): Greatman, LGeistlinger, Peace Sandy

Source: Figure 3

Description: Genera that differed significantly between adult and aged mice. Analysis of microbiome composition (ANCOM) revealed 6 genera a Dehalobacterium, b unspecified Peptococcaceae, c Sutterella, d unspecified Desulfovibrionaceae, and e Bilophila, with significantly different relative abundance in adult versus aged mice

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in Aging

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Dehalobacterium
Peptococcaceae
Sutterella
Desulfovibrionaceae
Bilophila

Revision editor(s): Greatman, LGeistlinger, Peace Sandy

Experiment 2


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Peace Sandy on 2024-2-20

Curated date: 2023/11/11

Curator: LGeistlinger

Revision editor(s): LGeistlinger, Peace Sandy

Differences from previous experiment shown

Subjects

Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
Body fat percentage Body fat percentage,body fat percentage
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
low body fat percentage
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
high body fat percentage
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
High body fat adult and aged mice
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
32
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
13

Lab analysis

Statistical Analysis

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by LGeistlinger on 2023-11-11

Curated date: 2023/11/11

Curator: LGeistlinger

Revision editor(s): LGeistlinger

Source: Figure 5b

Description: Bacteria that are associated with fat/lean percent mass in both adult and aged mice

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in high body fat percentage

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Turicibacter

Revision editor(s): LGeistlinger

Experiment 3


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Peace Sandy on 2024-2-20

Curated date: 2024/02/20

Curator: Peace Sandy

Revision editor(s): Peace Sandy

Differences from previous experiment shown

Subjects

Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
Body weight weight,Body weight,body weight
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
Less weight
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
Higher weight
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
Mice with Higher Body Weight
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
13
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
32

Lab analysis

Statistical Analysis

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Peace Sandy on 2024-2-20

Curated date: 2024/02/20

Curator: Peace Sandy

Revision editor(s): Peace Sandy

Source: Fig. 5

Description: Bacteria that are associated with weight and fat/lean percent mass in both adult and aged mice. Taxa abundance is represented by color scale. a Three genera Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, and Sutterella were significantly correlated with weight.

Abundance in Group 1: decreased abundance in Higher weight

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Bifidobacterium
Clostridium
Sutterella

Revision editor(s): Peace Sandy