Gut microbiota in children with type 1 diabetes differs from that in healthy children: a case-control study

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Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09
study design
Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
URI Uniform resource identifier for web resources.
Authors
Murri M, Leiva I, Gomez-Zumaquero JM, Tinahones FJ, Cardona F, Soriguer F, Queipo-Ortuño MI
Journal
BMC medicine
Year
2013
BACKGROUND: A recent study using a rat model found significant differences at the time of diabetes onset in the bacterial communities responsible for type 1 diabetes modulation. We hypothesized that type 1 diabetes in humans could also be linked to a specific gut microbiota. Our aim was to quantify and evaluate the difference in the composition of gut microbiota between children with type 1 diabetes and healthy children and to determine the possible relationship of the gut microbiota of children with type 1 diabetes with the glycemic level. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out with 16 children with type 1 diabetes and 16 healthy children. The fecal bacteria composition was investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The mean similarity index was 47.39% for the healthy children and 37.56% for the children with diabetes, whereas the intergroup similarity index was 26.69%. In the children with diabetes, the bacterial number of Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, and the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio were all significantly decreased, with the quantity of Bacteroidetes significantly increased with respect to healthy children. At the genus level, we found a significant increase in the number of Clostridium, Bacteroides and Veillonella and a significant decrease in the number of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Blautia coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group and Prevotella in the children with diabetes. We also found that the number of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, and the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio correlated negatively and significantly with the plasma glucose level while the quantity of Clostridium correlated positively and significantly with the plasma glucose level in the diabetes group. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study showing that type 1 diabetes is associated with compositional changes in gut microbiota. The significant differences in the number of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and Clostridium and in the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio observed between the two groups could be related to the glycemic level in the group with diabetes. Moreover, the quantity of bacteria essential to maintain gut integrity was significantly lower in the children with diabetes than the healthy children. These findings could be useful for developing strategies to control the development of type 1 diabetes by modifying the gut microbiota.

Experiment 1


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks743

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks753, WikiWorks743

Subjects

Location of subjects
Spain
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled (if applicable)
Homo sapiens
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Feces Cow dung,Cow pat,Droppings,Dung,Excrement,Excreta,Faeces,Fecal material,Fecal matter,Fewmet,Frass,Guano,Matières fécales@fr,Merde@fr,Ordure,Partie de la merde@fr,Piece of shit,Porción de mierda@es,Portion of dung,Portion of excrement,Portion of faeces,Portion of fecal material,Portion of fecal matter,Portion of feces,Portion of guano,Portion of scat,Portionem cacas,Scat,Spoor,Spraint,Stool,Teil der fäkalien@de,Feces
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
type I diabetes mellitus Autoimmune Diabete,Autoimmune Diabetes,Brittle Diabetes Mellitus,Diabete, Autoimmune,diabetes mellitis type 1,diabetes mellitis type I,DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 01,Diabetes mellitus type 1,Diabetes mellitus type 1 (disorder),Diabetes mellitus type I,Diabetes mellitus type I [insulin dependent type] [IDDM] [juvenile type], not stated as uncontrolled, with unspecified complication,Diabetes mellitus type I [insulin dependent type] [IDDM] [juvenile type], uncontrolled, with unspecified complication,Diabetes Mellitus, Brittle,Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin Dependent,Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent,Diabetes Mellitus, Juvenile Onset,Diabetes Mellitus, Juvenile-Onset,Diabetes Mellitus, Ketosis Prone,Diabetes Mellitus, Ketosis-Prone,Diabetes Mellitus, Sudden Onset,Diabetes Mellitus, Sudden-Onset,Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1,Diabetes Mellitus, Type I,Diabetes, Autoimmune,DMI UNSPF NT ST UNCNTRLD,DMI UNSPF UNCNTRLD,IDDM,IDDM - Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus,immune mediated diabetes,Insulin Dependent Diabetes,insulin dependent diabetes,Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus,insulin dependent diabetes mellitus,Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus,insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus,Juvenile Diabetes,juvenile diabetes,Juvenile onset diabetes mellitus,Juvenile-Onset Diabetes Mellitus,Ketosis-Prone Diabetes Mellitus,Mellitus, Sudden-Onset Diabetes,Sudden-Onset Diabetes Mellitus,Type 1 Diabetes,type 1 diabetes,Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus,type 1 diabetes mellitus,Type I Diabetes,type I diabetes,type I diabetes mellitus
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
healthy controls
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
children with type 1 diabetes
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed following the criteria of the American Diabetes Association and the appearance of at least two persistent, confirmed anti-islet autoantibodies (insulin autoantibodies, glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies or tyrosine phosphatase autoantibodies)
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
16
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
16
Antibiotics exclusion Number of days without antibiotics usage (if applicable) and other antibiotics-related criteria used to exclude participants (if any)
3 months

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
16S variable region One or more hypervariable region(s) of the bacterial 16S gene
V2-V3
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
RT-qPCR

Statistical Analysis

Statistical test
Mann-Whitney (Wilcoxon)
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
0.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
No
Matched on Factors on which subjects have been matched on in a case-control study
age, sex, race, delivery procedure, breastfeeding duration


Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2019-09-05

Curator: Yaseen Javaid

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks743

Source: Table 5 &6

Description: Gut microbiota in children with type 1 diabetes differs from that in healthy children: a case-control study.

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in children with type 1 diabetes

NCBI Links
Bacteroidota
Clostridium
Bacteroides
Veillonella

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks743

Signature 2

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2019-09-05

Curator: Yaseen Javaid

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks743

Source: Table 5 &6

Description: Gut microbiota in children with type 1 diabetes differs from that in healthy children: a case-control study.

Abundance in Group 1: decreased abundance in children with type 1 diabetes

NCBI Links
Actinomycetota
Bacillota
Prevotella
Blautia coccoides
Eubacterium rectale CAG:36
Bifidobacterium
Lactobacillus

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks743