Quantitative differences in intestinal Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in obese Indian children

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Needs review
study design
Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
URI
Authors
Balamurugan R, George G, Kabeerdoss J, Hepsiba J, Chandragunasekaran AM, Ramakrishna BS
Journal
The British journal of nutrition
Year
2010
Gut bacteria contribute to energy conservation in man through their ability to ferment unabsorbed carbohydrate. The present study examined the composition of predominant faecal microbiota in obese and non-obese children. The participants (n 28) aged 11-14 years provided fresh faecal samples and completed a dietary survey consisting of 24 h diet recall and a FFQ of commonly used foods taken over the previous 3 months. Faecal bacteria were quantitated by real-time PCR using primers targeted at 16S rDNA. Of the participants, fifteen (seven female) were obese, with median BMI-for-age at the 99th percentile (range 97 to>99) while thirteen participants (seven female) were normal weight, with median BMI-for age being at the 50th percentile (range 1-85). Consumption of energy, carbohydrates, fat and protein was not significantly different between the obese and non-obese participants. There was no significant difference between the two groups in faecal levels of Bacteroides-Prevotella, Bifidobacterium species, Lactobacillus acidophilus group or Eubacterium rectale. Levels of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly higher in obese children than in non-obese participants (P = 0.0253). We concluded that the finding of increased numbers of F. prausnitzii in the faeces of obese children in south India adds to the growing information on alterations in faecal microbiota in obesity.

Experiment 1


Needs review

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Subjects

Location of subjects
India
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled (if applicable)
Homo sapiens
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Feces Cow dung,Cow pat,Droppings,Dung,Excrement,Excreta,Faeces,Fecal material,Fecal matter,Fewmet,Frass,Guano,Matières fécales@fr,Merde@fr,Ordure,Partie de la merde@fr,Piece of shit,Porción de mierda@es,Portion of dung,Portion of excrement,Portion of faeces,Portion of fecal material,Portion of fecal matter,Portion of feces,Portion of guano,Portion of scat,Portionem cacas,Scat,Spoor,Spraint,Stool,Teil der fäkalien@de,Feces
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
obesity Adiposis,Adiposity,Obese,Obese (finding),obesity,Obesity (disorder),Obesity [Ambiguous],obesity disease,obesity disorder,Obesity NOS,Obesity, unspecified,Overweight and obesity
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
non-obese
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
obese
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
(Private) School Children
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
13
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
15
Antibiotics exclusion Number of days without antibiotics usage (if applicable) and other antibiotics-related criteria used to exclude participants (if any)
1 month

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
Not specified
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
RT-qPCR

Statistical Analysis

Statistical test
Mann-Whitney (Wilcoxon)
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
0.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
No
Matched on Factors on which subjects have been matched on in a case-control study
class/grade level


Signature 1

Needs review

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Mst Afroza Parvin

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: Figure 1

Description: Quantitative PCR of different bacterial groups from the faeces of obese (OB) and non-obese (NOB) participants

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in obese

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks