Fecal microbiome and volatile organic compound metabolome in obese humans with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

From BugSigDB
Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2023-5-30
study design
Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
URI
Authors
Raman M, Ahmed I, Gillevet PM, Probert CS, Ratcliffe NM, Smith S, Greenwood R, Sikaroodi M, Lam V, Crotty P, Bailey J, Myers RP, Rioux KP
Journal
Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association
Year
2013
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is similar to that of alcoholic liver disease. Colonic bacteria are a source of many metabolic products, including ethanol and other volatile organic compounds (VOC) that may have toxic effects on the human host after intestinal absorption and delivery to the liver via the portal vein. Recent data suggest that the composition of the gut microbiota in obese human beings is different from that of healthy-weight individuals. The aim of this study was to compare the colonic microbiome and VOC metabolome of obese NAFLD patients (n = 30) with healthy controls (n = 30). METHODS: Multitag pyrosequencing was used to characterize the fecal microbiota. Fecal VOC profiles were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in liver biochemistry and metabolic parameters in NAFLD. Deep sequencing of the fecal microbiome revealed over-representation of Lactobacillus species and selected members of phylum Firmicutes (Lachnospiraceae; genera, Dorea, Robinsoniella, and Roseburia) in NAFLD patients, which was statistically significant. One member of phylum Firmicutes was under-represented significantly in the fecal microbiome of NAFLD patients (Ruminococcaceae; genus, Oscillibacter). Fecal VOC profiles of the 2 patient groups were different, with a significant increase in fecal ester compounds observed in NAFLD patients. CONCLUSIONS: A significant increase in fecal ester VOC is associated with compositional shifts in the microbiome of obese NAFLD patients. These novel bacterial metabolomic and metagenomic factors are implicated in the etiology and complications of obesity.

Experiment 1


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2023-5-30

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks, Claregrieve1

Subjects

Location of subjects
Canada
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled (if applicable)
Homo sapiens
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Feces Cow dung,Cow pat,Droppings,Dung,Excrement,Excreta,Faeces,Fecal material,Fecal matter,Fewmet,Frass,Guano,Matières fécales@fr,Merde@fr,Ordure,Partie de la merde@fr,Piece of shit,Porción de mierda@es,Portion of dung,Portion of excrement,Portion of faeces,Portion of fecal material,Portion of fecal matter,Portion of feces,Portion of guano,Portion of scat,Portionem cacas,Scat,Spoor,Spraint,Stool,Teil der fäkalien@de,Feces
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
non-alcoholic fatty liver disease fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic,fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic, susceptibility to, 1,liver disease, alcoholic, susceptibility to, 1,NAFLD - Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease,NAFLD - nonalcoholic fatty liver disease,NAFLD1,non-alcoholic fatty liver,non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease,nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
healthy controls
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
Obese patients with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2 and clinically suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
30
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
30
Antibiotics exclusion Number of days without antibiotics usage (if applicable) and other antibiotics-related criteria used to exclude participants (if any)
3 months

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
Not specified
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
Roche454

Statistical Analysis

Data transformation Data transformation applied to microbial abundance measurements prior to differential abundance testing (if any).
relative abundances
Statistical test
Metastats
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
0.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
No


Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2023-5-30

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Rimsha Azhar

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: Table 4

Description: Significant taxa distinguishing in control and NAFLD

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Kiloniellaceae
Pasteurellaceae
Lactobacillaceae
Veillonellaceae
Lactobacillus
Robinsoniella
Roseburia
Dorea

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Signature 2

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2023-5-30

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Rimsha Azhar

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: Table 4

Description: Significant taxa distinguishing in control and NAFLD

Abundance in Group 1: decreased abundance in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Oscillospiraceae
Porphyromonadaceae
Oscillibacter

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks