Linking gut microbiota, metabolic syndrome and economic status based on a population-level analysis

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Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
Authors
He Y, Wu W, Wu S, Zheng HM, Li P, Sheng HF, Chen MX, Chen ZH, Ji GY, Zheng ZD, Mujagond P, Chen XJ, Rong ZH, Chen P, Lyu LY, Wang X, Xu JB, Wu CB, Yu N, Xu YJ, Yin J, Raes J, Ma WJ, Zhou HW
Journal
Microbiome
Year
2018
Keywords:
16S rRNA gene sequencing, Economic status, Epidemiology, Faecal microbiome, Guangdong Gut Microbiome Project, Metabolic syndrome, Population level survey
BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) epidemic is associated with economic development, lifestyle transition and dysbiosis of gut microbiota, but these associations are rarely studied at the population scale. Here, we utilised the Guangdong Gut Microbiome Project (GGMP), the largest Eastern population-based gut microbiome dataset covering individuals with different economic statuses, to investigate the relationships between the gut microbiome and host physiology, diet, geography, physical activity and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: At the population level, 529 OTUs were significantly associated with MetS. OTUs from Proteobacteria and Firmicutes (other than Ruminococcaceae) were mainly positively associated with MetS, whereas those from Bacteroidetes and Ruminococcaceae were negatively associated with MetS. Two hundred fourteen OTUs were significantly associated with host economic status (140 positive and 74 negative associations), and 157 of these OTUs were also MetS associated. A microbial MetS index was formulated to represent the overall gut dysbiosis of MetS. The values of this index were significantly higher in MetS subjects regardless of their economic status or geographical location. The index values did not increase with increasing personal economic status, although the prevalence of MetS was significantly higher in people of higher economic status. With increased economic status, the study population tended to consume more fruits and vegetables and fewer grains, whereas meat consumption was unchanged. Sedentary time was significantly and positively associated with higher economic status. The MetS index showed an additive effect with sedentary lifestyle, as the prevalence of MetS in individuals with high MetS index values and unhealthy lifestyles was significantly higher than that in the rest of the population. CONCLUSIONS: The gut microbiome is associated with MetS and economic status. A prolonged sedentary lifestyle, rather than Westernised dietary patterns, was the most notable lifestyle change in our Eastern population along with economic development. Moreover, gut dysbiosis and a Western lifestyle had an additive effect on increasing MetS prevalence.

Experiment 1


Needs review

Curated date: 2022/06/23

Curator: Kaluifeanyi101

Revision editor(s): Kaluifeanyi101

Subjects

Location of subjects
China
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled (if applicable)
Homo sapiens
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Feces Cow dung,Cow pat,Droppings,Dung,Excrement,Excreta,Faeces,Fecal material,Fecal matter,Fewmet,Frass,Guano,Matières fécales@fr,Merde@fr,Ordure,Partie de la merde@fr,Piece of shit,Porción de mierda@es,Portion of dung,Portion of excrement,Portion of faeces,Portion of fecal material,Portion of fecal matter,Portion of feces,Portion of guano,Portion of scat,Portionem cacas,Scat,Spoor,Spraint,Stool,Teil der fäkalien@de,Feces
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
socioeconomic statussocioeconomic status

Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
underdeveloped cities vs developed cities
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
7009 Individuals' fecal samples from underdeveloped cities with GDP/capita of 22.1K to 25.3K CNY, and those from developed cities with GDP/capita of 149.5K to 136.1K CNY. (continuous variables)
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
7009
Antibiotics exclusion Number of days without antibiotics usage (if applicable) and other antibiotics-related criteria used to exclude participants (if any)
Unspecified.

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
16S variable region One or more hypervariable region(s) of the bacterial 16S gene
V3-V4
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
Illumina

Statistical Analysis

Statistical test
Mann-Whitney (Wilcoxon)
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
Yes
Confounders controlled for Confounding factors that have been accounted for by stratification or model adjustment
age, sex, Confounders controlled for: "bristol stool scale" is not in the list (abnormal glucose tolerance, acetaldehyde, acute graft vs. host disease, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, adenoma, age, AIDS, alcohol consumption measurement, alcohol drinking, ...) of allowed values.bristol stool scale, Confounders controlled for: "geographic location" is not in the list (abnormal glucose tolerance, acetaldehyde, acute graft vs. host disease, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, adenoma, age, AIDS, alcohol consumption measurement, alcohol drinking, ...) of allowed values.geographic location

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
unchanged

Signature 1

Needs review

Curated date: 2022/06/23

Curator: Kaluifeanyi101

Revision editor(s): Kaluifeanyi101

Source: Figure 4a

Description: Associations between OTUs and host economic status. a Stacked plot showing the number of OTUs that are positively associated with income or spending (continuous variables).

Colors correspond to taxonomies in the legend.

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in underdeveloped cities vs developed cities

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Bacteroides
Betaproteobacteria
Lachnospiraceae
Parabacteroides
Rikenellaceae
Ruminococcus
Veillonellaceae

Revision editor(s): Kaluifeanyi101

Signature 2

Needs review

Curated date: 2022/06/23

Curator: Kaluifeanyi101

Revision editor(s): Kaluifeanyi101

Source: Figure 4a

Description: Associations between OTUs and host economic status. A Stacked plot showing the number of OTUs that are negatively associated with income or spending (continuous variables). Colors correspond to taxonomies in the legend.

Abundance in Group 1: decreased abundance in underdeveloped cities vs developed cities

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Clostridiaceae
Gammaproteobacteria
Peptostreptococcaceae
Prevotella
Ruminococcus

Revision editor(s): Kaluifeanyi101