Body Mass Index Differences in the Gut Microbiota Are Gender Specific

From BugSigDB
Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09
Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
URI
Authors
Gao X, Zhang M, Xue J, Huang J, Zhuang R, Zhou X, Zhang H, Fu Q, Hao Y
Journal
Frontiers in microbiology
Year
2018
Keywords:
16S rRNA, Chinese, gender, gut microbiota, obesity
Background: The gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in the development of obesity, but the influence of gender remains elusive. Using a large cohort of Chinese adults, our study aimed to identify differences in gut microbiota as a function of body mass index (BMI) and investigate gender specific features within these differences. Methods: Five hundred fifty-one participants were categorized as underweight, normal, overweight, or obese, based on their BMI. Fecal microbiome composition was profiled via 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Generalized linear model (GLM), BugBase, PICRUSt, and SPIEC-EASI were employed to assess the variabilities in richness, diversity, structure, organism-level microbiome phenotypes, molecular functions, and ecological networks of the bacterial community that associated with BMI and sex. Results: The bacterial community of the underweight group exhibited significantly higher alpha diversity than other BMI groups. When stratified by gender, the pattern of alpha diversity across BMI was maintained in females, but no significant difference in alpha diversity was detected among the BMI groups of males. An enrichment of Fusobacteria was observed in the fecal microbiota of obese males, while obese females demonstrated an increased relative abundance of Actinobacteria. Analysis of microbial community-level phenotypes revealed that underweight males tend to have more anaerobic and less facultatively anaerobic bacteria, indicating a reduced resistance to oxidative stress. Functionally, butyrate-acetoacetate CoA-transferase was enriched in obese individuals, which might favor energy accumulation. PhoH-like ATPase was found to be increased in male obese subjects, indicating a propensity to harvest energy. The microbial ecological network of the obese group contained more antagonistic microbial interactions as well as high-degree nodes. Conclusion: Using a large Chinese cohort, we demonstrated BMI-associated differences in gut microbiota composition, functions, and ecological networks, which were influenced by gender. Results in this area have shown variability across several independent studies, suggesting that further investigation is needed to understand the role of the microbiota in modulating host energy harvest and storage, and the impact of sex on these functions.

Experiment 1


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks, Atrayees

Subjects

Location of subjects
China
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled (if applicable)
Homo sapiens
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Feces Cow dung,Cow pat,Droppings,Dung,Excrement,Excreta,Faeces,Fecal material,Fecal matter,Fewmet,Frass,Guano,Matières fécales@fr,Merde@fr,Ordure,Partie de la merde@fr,Piece of shit,Porción de mierda@es,Portion of dung,Portion of excrement,Portion of faeces,Portion of fecal material,Portion of fecal matter,Portion of feces,Portion of guano,Portion of scat,Portionem cacas,Scat,Spoor,Spraint,Stool,Teil der fäkalien@de,Feces
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
sex design sex_design,sex design
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
male
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
female
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
259
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
292
Antibiotics exclusion Number of days without antibiotics usage (if applicable) and other antibiotics-related criteria used to exclude participants (if any)
2 months

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
16S variable region One or more hypervariable region(s) of the bacterial 16S gene
V3-V4
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
Illumina

Statistical Analysis

Statistical test
DESeq2
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
0.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
Yes
Confounders controlled for Confounding factors that have been accounted for by stratification or model adjustment
age

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
increased
Simpson Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species evenness
unchanged
Inverse Simpson Modification of Simpsons index D as 1/D to obtain high values in datasets of high diversity and vice versa
unchanged
Richness Number of species
increased

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Marianthi Thomatos

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: supplementry figure S2

Description: Differences in body mass index and gut microbiota by Gender

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in female

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Ruminococcus

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Experiment 2


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks, Atrayees

Differences from previous experiment shown

Subjects

Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
obesity Adiposis,Adiposity,Obese,Obese (finding),obesity,Obesity (disorder),Obesity [Ambiguous],obesity disease,obesity disorder,Obesity NOS,Obesity, unspecified,Overweight and obesity
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
female normal weight
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
female obese
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
168
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
20

Lab analysis

Statistical Analysis

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
unchanged
Simpson Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species evenness
unchanged
Inverse Simpson Modification of Simpsons index D as 1/D to obtain high values in datasets of high diversity and vice versa
unchanged
Richness Number of species
increased

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Marianthi Thomatos

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: Text + fig 2B

Description: Differences in body mass index and gut microbiota by Gender

Abundance in Group 1: decreased abundance in female obese

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Phascolarctobacterium

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Experiment 3


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks, Atrayees

Differences from previous experiment shown

Subjects

Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
male normal weight
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
male obese
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
93
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
38

Lab analysis

Statistical Analysis

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
unchanged
Simpson Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species evenness
unchanged
Inverse Simpson Modification of Simpsons index D as 1/D to obtain high values in datasets of high diversity and vice versa
unchanged
Richness Number of species
unchanged

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Marianthi Thomatos

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: Text + fig 2B

Description: Differences in body mass index and gut microbiota by Gender

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in male obese

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Butyricimonas
Fusobacterium

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Experiment 4


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: WikiWorks

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks, Atrayees

Differences from previous experiment shown

Subjects

Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
normal weight
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
obese
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
261
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
58

Lab analysis

Statistical Analysis

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
unchanged
Simpson Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species evenness
unchanged
Inverse Simpson Modification of Simpsons index D as 1/D to obtain high values in datasets of high diversity and vice versa
unchanged
Richness Number of species
unchanged

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Shaimaa Elsafoury on 2021/02/09

Curated date: 2021/01/10

Curator: Marianthi Thomatos

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks

Source: Text + fig 2B

Description: Differences in body mass index and gut microbiota by Gender

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in obese

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Fusobacteriota
Fusobacterium

Revision editor(s): WikiWorks