Ecological succession in the vaginal microbiota during pregnancy and birth

From BugSigDB
Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30
study design
Citation
PMID PubMed identifier for scientific articles.
DOI Digital object identifier for electronic documents.
Authors
Rasmussen MA, Thorsen J, Dominguez-Bello MG, Blaser MJ, Mortensen MS, Brejnrod AD, Shah SA, Hjelmsø MH, Lehtimäki J, Trivedi U, Bisgaard H, Sørensen SJ, Stokholm J
Journal
The ISME journal
Year
2020
The mother's vaginal microbiota represents the first microbes to which a child is exposed when delivered vaginally. However, little is known about the composition and development of the vaginal microbiota during pregnancy and birth. Here, we analyzed the vaginal microbiota of 57 women in pregnancy week 24, 36 and at birth after rupture of membranes but before delivery, and further compared the composition with that of the gut and airways of the 1-week-old child. The vaginal community structure had dramatic changes in bacterial diversity and taxonomic distribution, yet carried an individual-specific signature. The relative abundance of most bacterial taxa increased stepwise from week 24 of pregnancy until birth, with a gradual decline of Lactobacillus. Mother-to-child vertical transfer, as suggested by sharing, was modest, with the strongest transfer being for Clostridiales followed by Lactobacillales and Enterobacteriales. In conclusion, late gestation is associated with an increase in maternal vaginal microbiota diversity, and vaginal bacteria at birth only modestly predict the composition of the neonatal microbiota.

Experiment 1


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30

Curated date: 2021/10/28

Curator: Joyessa

Revision editor(s): Joyessa, Claregrieve1, WikiWorks

Subjects

Location of subjects
United States of America
Host species Species from which microbiome was sampled (if applicable)
Homo sapiens
Body site Anatomical site where microbial samples were extracted from according to the Uber Anatomy Ontology
Vagina Distal oviductal region,Distal portion of oviduct,Vaginae,Vagina
Condition The experimental condition / phenotype studied according to the Experimental Factor Ontology
gestational age gestational age
Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
Week 24
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
Week 36
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
gestational age of 36 weeks
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
56
Group 1 sample size Number of subjects in the case (exposed) group
57

Lab analysis

Sequencing type
16S
16S variable region One or more hypervariable region(s) of the bacterial 16S gene
V4
Sequencing platform Manufacturer and experimental platform used for quantifying microbial abundance
Illumina

Statistical Analysis

Statistical test
Kruskall-Wallis
Significance threshold p-value or FDR threshold used for differential abundance testing (if any)
0.05
MHT correction Have statistical tests be corrected for multiple hypothesis testing (MHT)?
Yes

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
increased

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30

Curated date: 2021/10/28

Curator: Joyessa

Revision editor(s): Fatima, Joyessa, Claregrieve1

Source: Figure 3

Description: Differentially abundant vaginal taxa at genus level between Week 24 vs. Week 36.

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in Week 36

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Moraxella
Streptococcus
Staphylococcus
Enterococcus
Corynebacterium
Gemella

Revision editor(s): Fatima, Joyessa, Claregrieve1

Signature 2

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30

Curated date: 2021/10/28

Curator: Joyessa

Revision editor(s): Fatima, Joyessa, Claregrieve1

Source: Figure 3

Description: Differentially abundant vaginal taxa at genus level between Week 24 vs. Week 36.

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in Week 36

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Lactobacillus

Revision editor(s): Fatima, Joyessa, Claregrieve1

Experiment 2


Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30

Curated date: 2021/11/14

Curator: Joyessa

Revision editor(s): LGeistlinger, Joyessa, Claregrieve1, WikiWorks

Differences from previous experiment shown

Subjects

Group 0 name Corresponds to the control (unexposed) group for case-control studies
36
Group 1 name Corresponds to the case (exposed) group for case-control studies
Birth
Group 1 definition Diagnostic criteria applied to define the specific condition / phenotype represented in the case (exposed) group
birth timepoint
Group 0 sample size Number of subjects in the control (unexposed) group
57

Lab analysis

Statistical Analysis

Alpha Diversity

Shannon Estimator of species richness and species evenness: more weight on species richness
unchanged

Signature 1

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30

Curated date: 2021/11/15

Curator: Joyessa

Revision editor(s): Joyessa, Claregrieve1

Source: Figure 3

Description: Differentially abundant microbial taxa between the 36 week timepoint and birth timepoint

Abundance in Group 1: increased abundance in Birth

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Corynebacterium
Enterococcus
Gemella
Moraxella
Staphylococcus
Streptococcus

Revision editor(s): Joyessa, Claregrieve1

Signature 2

Reviewed Marked as Reviewed by Claregrieve1 on 2022/08/30

Curated date: 2022/08/30

Curator: Claregrieve1

Revision editor(s): Claregrieve1

Source: Figure 3

Description: Differentially abundant microbial taxa between the 36 week timepoint and birth timepoint

Abundance in Group 1: decreased abundance in Birth

NCBI Quality ControlLinks
Lactobacillus

Revision editor(s): Claregrieve1